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 Post subject: Re: I Just Heard The News About Pittsburgh
PostPosted: Sun Oct 28, 2018 8:49 am 
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We haven’t hit bottom yet.

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 Post subject: Re: I Just Heard The News About Pittsburgh
PostPosted: Sun Oct 28, 2018 9:52 am 
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We have a big sign saying on our doors at work that we have no firearms. I tried to convince HR that why announce to a disgruntled employee or anyone that we are sitting ducks when entering our facility.

They make us watch a ridiculous movie that is so impractical in this type of crises on a checklist of what to do. SMH

I dont carry or anything like that so I have no dog in the gun argument.

I am one of only of 5 that dont have a permit.

Others have a revolver on the table while eating. WTF...and they have kids at the table. Too many mob movies.


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 Post subject: Re: I Just Heard The News About Pittsburgh
PostPosted: Sun Oct 28, 2018 9:54 am 
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I lurked here for years and there is one poster who comes back with different names who had a problem with race.
Who knows..maybe only an internet tough guy but you never know.


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 Post subject: Re: I Just Heard The News About Pittsburgh
PostPosted: Sun Oct 28, 2018 10:22 am 
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alancac98 wrote:
I live out in the boonies. It's a 15 minute drive to the little town I teach in. When I go into town for anything, my .45 goes with me. Now that it's getting colder, I can now just slide it into my coat or vest pocket. My head is always on a swivel whether I'm getting gas, a soda at Sheetz, or grocery shopping at Walmart. I take few chances and always assume something is going to happen that I will need to protect myself or family from. It's keeps me always surveying the stores or areas around me. The only time I get real nervous is when I'm in Sheetz and have to cash out, because my focus is on cashier and not the door and store. I'm not paranoid, but I try to be as prepared as possible. You have to be these days or you have a good chance of becoming a terrible part of the statistics.


Is that what being "free" feels like. Having a gun in your pocket and your head on a swivel? Is being nervous because you are not facing everyone in the store normal? I would say it is very possible you have a little paranoia in your being. Hope it does not become schizophrenic paranoia because as you stated you carry a gun everywhere you go. Best of luck to you and all those you come into contact with.


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 Post subject: Re: I Just Heard The News About Pittsburgh
PostPosted: Mon Oct 29, 2018 5:53 pm 
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Stinger8 wrote:
alancac98 wrote:
I live out in the boonies. It's a 15 minute drive to the little town I teach in. When I go into town for anything, my .45 goes with me. Now that it's getting colder, I can now just slide it into my coat or vest pocket. My head is always on a swivel whether I'm getting gas, a soda at Sheetz, or grocery shopping at Walmart. I take few chances and always assume something is going to happen that I will need to protect myself or family from. It's keeps me always surveying the stores or areas around me. The only time I get real nervous is when I'm in Sheetz and have to cash out, because my focus is on cashier and not the door and store. I'm not paranoid, but I try to be as prepared as possible. You have to be these days or you have a good chance of becoming a terrible part of the statistics.


Is that what being "free" feels like. Having a gun in your pocket and your head on a swivel? Is being nervous because you are not facing everyone in the store normal? I would say it is very possible you have a little paranoia in your being. Hope it does not become schizophrenic paranoia because as you stated you carry a gun everywhere you go. Best of luck to you and all those you come into contact with.


Your point of view I guess. I'm aware of my surroundings. I'm prepared. As the saying goes: fail to plan, plan to fail. I'll gladly make sure my wife and kids are as safe as I can provide. Again, I'm not paranoid at all, just realistically aware of today's problems. And yes, I feel free. I'm not encumbered at all by the steps I have taken to be ready. I have several police officer friends that actually talked to me about training myself to be cognitively aware with barely noticing what I am doing. It's not like I go into a place thinking hard about what could happen. I've been doing it since I first got my CC permit (1993). I never have my back to an entrance, it has become second nature. And thank you, should I ever need to defend myself, I'm aware of the fact that I could use all of the luck I can get!


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 Post subject: Re: I Just Heard The News About Pittsburgh
PostPosted: Tue Oct 30, 2018 11:59 am 
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Stinger8 wrote:
alancac98 wrote:
I live out in the boonies. It's a 15 minute drive to the little town I teach in. When I go into town for anything, my .45 goes with me. Now that it's getting colder, I can now just slide it into my coat or vest pocket. My head is always on a swivel whether I'm getting gas, a soda at Sheetz, or grocery shopping at Walmart. I take few chances and always assume something is going to happen that I will need to protect myself or family from. It's keeps me always surveying the stores or areas around me. The only time I get real nervous is when I'm in Sheetz and have to cash out, because my focus is on cashier and not the door and store. I'm not paranoid, but I try to be as prepared as possible. You have to be these days or you have a good chance of becoming a terrible part of the statistics.


Is that what being "free" feels like. Having a gun in your pocket and your head on a swivel? Is being nervous because you are not facing everyone in the store normal? I would say it is very possible you have a little paranoia in your being. Hope it does not become schizophrenic paranoia because as you stated you carry a gun everywhere you go. Best of luck to you and all those you come into contact with.



Well I will tell you if you have ever been in the Military or served in shit countries, or been shot at.. you will always have your head on a swivel and know your AO that your walking into. I am just like that as well, I don't sit with my back to the door, I keep my gun handy all the time.. I am not paranoid at all, I am just ready to defend myself and my family if need be. Most times I forget I have my gun with me.. Life goes on as normal.. I am sure once I leave the border town that I am stationed at now and move back to Potter Co. my carry practices might slack off.. BTW I carried every day in Alaska as well.. but that was for the 4 legged threats..


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 Post subject: Re: I Just Heard The News About Pittsburgh
PostPosted: Thu Nov 01, 2018 11:43 am 
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The University of Tennessee stands with Pittsburgh. My daughter is a Junior at UT/Knoxville and sent me a picture this morning of "The Rock". The students can paint it any way they see fit. Marriage proposals, lamenting the football team, etc.,

And today...

Image

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 Post subject: Re: I Just Heard The News About Pittsburgh
PostPosted: Thu Nov 01, 2018 2:24 pm 
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VASteelerGuy wrote:
I've spent a fair amount of time in combat zones and I can only tell you that you should think like you drive...defensively.

Always look around, have an exit plan.

This applies to everything. I never sit in a restaurant with my back to the door/exit or view of the crowd. Not paranoid level, just a cautionary position as I know I can react and do things for my friends to keep them alive. A lot of veterans do the same thing. Thankfully I'm retired, but I've not retired from the mechanics of things.

First aid kits are great, but often not available. Know how to use everything around you - belts, towels, t-shirts, feminine products, wood chair leg, utensils, car jack handle, etc. I'm here to tell you can repurpose almost anything and save a life or prolong for the professionals to get there. Take a first aid course.

Know what structures can protect you - drywall shields you from observations but does little to stop a bullet or shrapnel. Behind structural columns, metal, cinder block, etc., all increase your chances if you cannot escape.

Be prepared to give your life if you think there's no chance to escape. Fear is the biggest killer. Turn whatever you can into a weapon. If you are close enough - salt or any chemical in the eyes. Throw objects, knives, whatever it takes if you truly have no other options. Don't think you'll punch your way out - dig your fingers into eye sockets if possible if you find yourself in close quarters. Be prepared to kill with extreme amounts of fear and adrenal going through your body, use it, your strength will give you a chance.

Waiting to die is not an option.


EXCELLENT stuff here, thank you for sharing your knowledge! I travel quite a bit with work including areas outside the U.S. Whenever I am in a restaurant or other public place, I am always mindful of entrances and exits. In a restaurant, I always face toward the front door so I can see who is coming in. If I am walking with my wife or child on the street, I make sure that I am walking on the outside, closest to traffic and to other people walking by. Most importantly, head on a swivel is key. I also never wear ear buds or head phones if I am out in public.

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 Post subject: Re: I Just Heard The News About Pittsburgh
PostPosted: Thu Nov 01, 2018 4:51 pm 
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My daughter, the one who sent me the picture above, decided not to go to the beach for spring break her senior year in high school with the hordes of other hormonally challenged yutes. I was thrilled. But then she told me that she and her bestie wanted to go to Cancun instead. Fucking hell. But honestly, I couldn't really come up with a much better scenario in Fort Lauderdale. I was there as a senior decades ago, and also lived in southern Florida for a number of years and witnessed it as a bystander. So the plans were made.

I sat both of them down and talked about safety,

New, unfamilar places are dangerous. Someone who would do you harm most likely already knows the area, and knows it well. You are going to a tourist area. Criminals know that. They know you are a tourist. You don't blend in. They do. So stay together. Always.

Do not go anywhere that a stranger directs you to. Go only to the places you plan. "My tent/booth is just around the corner. I have the best prices, best quality, yada yada." Unless you were planning on going around the corner already, don't go. Know where you want to go, and don't deviate.

Clubbing. You're going to do it. I know. So do it safely. Before entering any loud, chaotic environment (aka fun) choose a landmark outside that is away from the building. A fire hydrant on the other side of the street is a good choice. That way, if something happens inside and you get separated, you both reconvene at the landmark. Under no circumstance do you leave the venue and go anywhere alone, other than to the landmark. If there is a fire, a shooting, the building collapses, a fight breaks out, etc., you head out of the building, away from the danger and both meet up at the landmark. Once in the building, no fun happens until you find at least two exits. If you can't find two exits, leave. Once you know how to get out, be safe. And if one of you feels threatened or uncomfortable, you both leave, no questions asked.

Drinking is a social event. I get it. But YOUR drink is personal. You get your own drinks. You hold your own drinks. If you set your drink down, it's not yours. If someone gives you one, it's not yours. If you pay for one and ANYONE other than the bartender hands it directly to you, it is NOT yours. And you don't drink anything NOT YOURS. If you have any questions about this, or get confused at any time about this, don't drink it. Period.

Make plans. Stick to the plans.

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 Post subject: Re: I Just Heard The News About Pittsburgh
PostPosted: Sat Nov 03, 2018 11:36 am 
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Great story I just read......


Love wins in Pittsburgh
Special to The Athletic 3h ago 3
By Yogi​​ Roth

Like most of us, I saw the alert come across my phone, “Shooting in Pittsburgh synagogue.”

Every student-athlete will tell you that their school is special, and they should. Pitt is that for me too. But more special to me than the school is the city. The people of Pittsburgh embraced a walk-on from a small town in the summer of 2000, and they never forgot me. Through good times and bad, in notable games and embarrassing ones. Pittsburgh led with its heart, with grace. The people stuck with love.

It was Saturday morning, and I was packing up my bag to head to Stanford, where Ted Robinson, Jill Savage and myself would broadcast the Washington State-Stanford game in a matter of hours. Before walking out of my hotel room to go for a run, I pulled out my phone and texted two people who live in Pittsburgh at 9:18 a.m.

“Please say you two are OK? Read about synagogue.”

The first response, a thumbs up emoji, from a young man named Jesse who became family while I was a wide receiver at Pitt.

The second response from Michele, “My brothers were there. Waiting for answers. Not good.”

I ran and thought of my grandparents, who were Holocaust survivors. They would often talk about their time in concentration camps or hiding out from Nazis. When I would ask them about their experiences they were surprisingly not angry and at the end of our conversation, they would wipe away their tears and simply say, “Yogi—Love wins.”

Miles later, my mind drifted to Squirrel Hill, where Michele and I would also run in the streets, talking the entire time of course. In college, I was like most student-athletes; my sport was my identity. But I was also seeking purpose beyond the field.

A friend would introduce me to Michele Rosenthal, who was working in local politics at the time. From day one, she became my “big sister,” as she liked to say. For three summers Michele would be my boss, first working with a state representative and then working alongside the mayor of Pittsburgh.

I would arrive at work each day at 8 a.m., and she would pour her entire soul into my mind. She taught me how to communicate with the public, what discipline meant at work and, most importantly, how to listen.

For three straight summers, we would go to lunch four days a week, talking about her life, mine and of course football. Michele isn’t just a football fan, she is an expert. She grew up in Pittsburgh and wore the Steelers’ black and gold with pride. But she also understood that life was much larger than the game.

Hours later, I was driving to the game. With Michele’s two brothers on my mind, the upcoming game was weaving in and out of my thoughts, like a wide receiver running through zone coverage, almost a blur. I arrived at our pre-game production meeting thirty minutes early, as I couldn’t sit in the hotel any longer.

I sat next to our crew and listened. Gillian, a camera operator, spoke about her beloved Florida State Seminoles’ loss. Ernie, our assistant director, shared that he had indeed stayed up to see the Dodgers win in 18 innings and Scott, our director, was nervous about his USC Trojans that afternoon.

After our meeting, I called Michele, but it went straight to voicemail.

I texted: “Checking in. Love and light your way!!!”

In an instant, she responded, “Thank you. My older brother shot and assumed killed. Can’t find out about other brother. FBI won’t confirm.”

My heart sank. For Michele. For her family. For Pittsburgh.

I walked to the grass at Stanford, stopped at the 29-yard line like I always do, said the same prayer I’ve said for 19 years and tried to learn a little about the teams playing.

But this night was different. The conversations weren’t about scheme or player availability.

I stood next to Pete Alamar, Stanford’s special teams coordinator, who lit up when he spoke of how his daughters love animals. He shared how they can’t drive by a stray cat or dog without taking it home. I laughed with Stanford wide receiver coach Bobby Kennedy, as he told me about his wide receiver dinners and how he relaxes each Thursday night. I listened as Mike Leach shared a traveling story from Cambodia that had nothing to do with his Air Raid offense. Even if I wanted to learn about X’s and O’s the football gods were not having it—this night was about humanity.

If you ever went to an event in Pittsburgh with Michele you were in the best of hands, as every hand would try to shake hers, literally. While she didn’t have the title of “Mayor,” she could have been. Like every talented professional, Michele had plenty of recruiters vying for her to join their team. The Steelers would eventually win when Michele joined their staff as Head of Community Relations. In true Pittsburgh Steelers form, they evaluated right and made an incredible acquisition. In true Michele form, she became the quiet bridge between the team and the city.

I remember the day she got the job. She was so happy but so humble. We went for a walk along the streets of Squirrel Hill, and she spoke of the front office, the coaches and the players. It was a job she was proud of not only because of her newfound Sunday schedule but because of the city she was able to promote, the community she was able to celebrate.

Back in Northern California, Stanford received the opening kickoff. Within moments it was evident that the Cardinal vs. the Cougs would be a classic, as each team played at a championship level. K.J. Costello and Gardner Minshew proved to be every bit the elite quarterbacks our crew expected. Bryce Love ran like his old self and like always, Ted Robinson’s play-by-play reminded me how lucky I am to work alongside him.

The game ended with Minshew proving that he is worthy of a Heisman invite and his Cougars solidified first place in the Pac-12 North. The game also ended with a text that didn’t get a response from Michele.

When we landed through thick clouds at LAX, I too felt in a haze. I was thinking about Michele and imagining how she could be feeling. Each time my heart began to break I told myself that maybe they are OK. Maybe they survived.

At 8:59 am on Sunday I saw another alert flash on my phone, “Names released of those lost in Pittsburgh.”

Michele often spoke about Cecil and David Rosenthal on our walks to and from the office. It was just small talk, but she spoke with an obvious reverence and pride. They both had an intellectual disability but a spirit that beamed through Michele every time she spoke of them. One of the articles detailing them said that Cecil and David were fixtures at the Tree of Life Synagogue, attending services nearly every Saturday for much of their lives. Cecil was known to have an infectious laugh. David was described as having a gentle spirit. Not a shocker that Michele has both.

As another college football Saturday commences the world of sports will continue, as will the world around it. Pittsburgh will unite, in fact, it already has, but those affected by this senseless and anti-Semitic act will struggle. Michele and her family, along with the other 10 families, will hurt. And I hope that we hurt too.

I also hope that we take action, whether it’s by calling someone you love, praying for someone you love or standing up for something you love. In times like these, we have to remember what my grandparents would often say:

Love wins.

Cecil and David would want us to.

Editor’s note: Yogi Roth was a wide receiver with Pitt from 2000 until 2003. A former coach at USC, he is now a college football analyst with the Pac-12 Network and hosts the Yogi Roth Podcast. He is on Twitter at @YogiRoth.


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