It is currently Sun May 27, 2018 6:06 am

All times are UTC - 5 hours [ DST ]




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 52 posts ]  Go to page 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6  Next
Author Message
 Post subject: The Grades are already coming out...
PostPosted: Sun Apr 29, 2018 6:10 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Tue Jul 08, 2014 9:45 pm
Posts: 12621
Here is one scribed report card....

Quote:
Day 3 of the 2018 NFL Draft is in the books, and the Pittsburgh Steelers were able to bring in a whopping three more picks during the late rounds. Similar to their top pick of Terrell Edmunds, many experts were wondering just what was going on when the team made some of their picks.

Needless to say, there were some good expert grades, and some not-so-good. Take a look at just some of the NFL experts who weighed-in on the Steelers’ Day 3 haul throughout the draft process.

SB Nation
Pittsburgh Steelers

For six years in a row, the first pick for the Steelers came on the defensive side of the ball. It was a shock to see Terrell Edmunds get taken in the first round by Pittsburgh. Know one saw that coming, but Edmunds can come down hill and can cover. Still, the value is questionable.

Wide receiver James Washington, taken at No. 60 overall, is a good vertical threat who will help the Steelers replace Martavis Bryant, who was traded to Oakland. Mason Rudolph at No. 76 is a pick that got a lot of attention. Can he be the successor to Ben Roethlisberger or is he just another Landry Jones? At the least, it was a good value choice. Western Michigan left tackle Chukwuma Okorafor could move to the right in the NFL, but he’s a solid player and a replacement for Chris Hubbard. Taken in the fifth round, safety Marcus Allen graded out higher than Edmunds for some.

From a value standpoint, arguably Pittsburgh’s best choice was Jaylen Samuels of North Carolina State. He’s a combo tight end, fullback and running back. If there’s a team that can figure out how to use him, it’s the Steelers.

Grade: C-

NFL.com
Pittsburgh Steelers Draft picks: Virginia Tech S Terrell Edmunds (No. 28 overall), Oklahoma State WR James Washington (No. 60 overall), Oklahoma State QB Mason Rudolph (No. 76 overall), Western Michigan OT Chukwuma Okorafor (No. 92 overall), Penn State S Marcus Allen (No. 148 overall), N.C. State RB Jaylen Samuels (No. 165 overall), Alabama DT Joshua Frazier (No. 246 overall).

Day 1 grade: B+
Day 2 grade: B+
Day 3 grade: A
Overall grade: B+

The skinny: The Steelers went safety, as expected, but picked Edmunds, the brother of fellow first-round pick Tremaine, instead of Stanford’s Justin Reid and others. This was a surprise pick to most, and probably a round early -- but given his strength and NFL bloodlines (father, Ferrell, played tight end in the league), but maybe it shouldn’t have been. He’ll be a welcomed addition to the team, either way. Trading Martavis Bryant to Oakland for a third-round pick meant they needed to find another big-play receiver. Washington isn’t tall or an elite speedster, but his super-long arms and ability to win the jump ball make him a solid find late in the second round. He was paired with his former teammate, Rudolph, in the third round. They could make for an interesting duo in a couple of years. Rudolph was a good third-round value. Okorafor could become a starter, but needs to work harder and faster on the field or he’ll be out of the league fast. Allen adds another tough-minded safety to the Steelers’ defensive back trove, though I believe he could be used in a linebacker-type role to take advantage of his toughness and agility. Samuels fits the Steelers’ usage of fullback/H-backs quite well, and will add another wrinkle to their offense. Frazier is a perfect fit for a team in need of a hardworking nose tackle.

CBS Sports
Round 5: Marcus Allen, FS, Penn State

Grade: C+

Another box safety for Pittsburgh. Decent athlete. Slow play-recognition skills, which hurts him in coverage.

Round 5: Jaylen Samuels, TE, NC State

Grade: A-

Ideal player as NFL shifts toward a “positionless” game. Delanie Walker-like. Good, not great in any area. Shifty.

Round 7: Joshua Frazier, DT, Alabama

Grade: C+

Classic, block-eating Alabama nose tackle. Slow feet. Uses his heavy hands well but doesn’t have pass-rush ability. His height hurts him against low-center-of-gravity interior linemen.

Bleacher Report
Round 5: Pittsburgh Steelers: Marcus Allen, Safety, Penn State
Strengths: Character, run support, fundamentals.
Weaknesses: Limited upside.

Marcus Allen is not related to Raiders legend Marcus Allen, though Curtis Martin is his godfather, which has to count for something. (Narrator: It does not count for anything.) Allen is a fundamentally sound, high-effort Cover 2 safety who projects as a capable NFL starter. He’s also a three-year team captain who keeps plays in front of him and will step up in run support. So he’s good. Just don’t hear the name and let your mind trick you into thinking he’s a future Hall of Famer. This should be a popular pick among Steelers fans.

Grade: B-plus

Round 5: Pittsburgh Steelers: Jaylen Samuels, Running Back, North Carolina State
This is the best running back class in years! To help keep things straight and minimize the jargon, Bleacher Report proudly presents another installment of our Field Guide to the 2018 Running Backs!

Athleticism: Very good. Jaylen Samuels tested well as a running back at the combine, even though he tested with the tight ends.

Every-down rushing: Fair to good. Samuels didn’t run between the tackles much for the Wolfpack, but he looked like a quick, decisive downhill runner with power at the Senior Bowl.

Open-field rushing: Fair. Samuels is not that elusive but can accelerate into fourth gear.

Receiving value: Very good to excellent. Samuels is kinda-sorta a slot receiver.

Pass protection: Very good to excellent. Samuels is kinda-sorta also an H-back or tight end. It’s complicated.

Contrary opinion from a “source” having an anxiety attack: Versatility? Who needs versatility? My scouting handbook says to look for prototype runners like Franco Harris and Archie Griffin! Come to think of it, this thing hasn’t been updated in quite some time...

Bottom Line: Samuels is unique. The best comp for him may be Keith Byars, the 1980s Ohio State standout who was miscast as a workhorse back for the Eagles but became a 60-80-catch weapon as a fullback/H-back/sometime rusher. He’s less a potential replacement for Le’Veon Bell than a complement to Bell. The Steelers just acquired one more potential matchup headache. The rest of the AFC should be worried. Especially the Patriots.

Grade: A

Round 7: Pittsburgh Steelers: Joshua Frazier, Defensive Tackle, Alabama
Strengths: Space eating.
Weaknesses: Run defender only.

That’s right; even Alabama’s situational run-pluggers get drafted. Frazier is a Damion Square-type. The Steelers have more use for pure nose tackles than most teams.

Grade: Fair


What say Fury Members....

_________________
Tomlin wrote:
You Know; Really Not A Lot To Say. I Really Don't Plan A Lot For These Moments http://www.steelers.com/videos/videos/T ... b99b3e2551


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: The Grades are already coming out...
PostPosted: Sun Apr 29, 2018 6:16 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Tue Jul 08, 2014 11:33 pm
Posts: 15755
Samuels is actually quite a bit like Franco, in that he wasn't the feature back in college, but did a lot of everything there as sort of a fullback.

_________________
Suwanee88 wrote:
But it’s your fault that you are kind of a stubborn jagoff that would argue with a fence post


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: The Grades are already coming out...
PostPosted: Sun Apr 29, 2018 6:22 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Tue Jul 08, 2014 9:45 pm
Posts: 12621
What Fowler had to say...

Quote:
Round 1, No. 28 overall: Terrell Edmunds, S, Virginia Tech
My take: The Steelers needed improvement in the secondary and believe they just got better with Edmunds, who wasn't considered a first-round pick by many analysts but clearly was by Pittsburgh. General manager Kevin Colbert said Edmunds was the best player remaining on their board at No. 28. Coach Mike Tomlin lauded his versatility as a free safety, strong safety and subpackage linebacker. The Steelers will have "a number of things on the menu" for him, Tomlin said. Edmunds was a team leader at Virginia Tech, ran a 4.47-second 40 and is a vocal communicator on the field, which should help him play early. Now they must sort out a safety lineup that already includes free-agent signing Morgan Burnett and former second-round pick Sean Davis. There are no excuses for a secondary that is loaded, with veteran Joe Haden and four Day 1 or 2 picks drafted since 2016.
Family affair: For the second straight year, the Steelers spent a first-round pick on an NFL sibling -- T.J. Watt last year and now Edmunds, whose brother, Tremaine, was drafted No. 16 overall by the Buffalo Bills. The Steelers learned all about the family at a dinner with the brothers and their parents around Virginia Tech's pro day. Colbert said he learned Terrell was the more vocal brother. He also learned he must take care of his new draft pick, or else. "I remember my mom questioning them to death," said Edmunds about the dinner. Colbert was with the Miami Dolphins organization when it drafted father Ferrell Edmunds in 1988.

Tough it out: Playing through a shoulder injury that required surgery in November might have affected Edmunds' draft stock, but the Steelers considered that a positive. Edmunds finished the season with 59 tackles, 1.5 sacks and 2 interceptions in 10 games despite a nagging injury.

"For him to play as good as he did last year with an injured shoulder was truly impressive for us," said Colbert, who added Steelers doctors are comfortable with Edmunds' shoulder. The year before, Edmunds finished with four interceptions.

Round 2, No. 60 overall: James Washington, WR, Oklahoma State
My take: The Steelers acted quickly to replace Martavis Bryant with No. 60 pick James Washington, who averaged 20.9 yards per catch as a senior at Oklahoma State. Pittsburgh hopes to rediscover the magic they found with last year’s second-round receiver JuJu Smith-Schuster, who led all rookies in touchdowns and receiving yards last season. The knocks on Washington are size (5-foot-11) and his 4.54-second 40 time, but he plays faster than that time, is physical at the line of scrimmage and has a flare for chunk yardage. The Steelers know how to draft receivers and might have just found another gem. “Tough guy, runs fast, scores touchdowns,” offensive coordinator Randy Fichtner said.

Receiver crop: Washington has a degree in agriculture and says he’s a farmer. He does cattle ranching back home in Stamford, Texas, mostly helping his dad with heavy lifting. Now that he’s headed to Pittsburgh, he plans to utilize what he has learned on the field. “Hard work and dedication,” said Washington when asked about his best attributes as a player. And as a playcaller, Fichtner likes that Washington provides “several tricks,” meaning he can do a bit of everything and catches the ball cleanly.

Pittsburgh Punisher: The Pittsburgh media joked with Washington over a conference call that the Steelers share a facility with Pitt, which Washington torched for 14 catches, 420 yards and 2 touchdowns in two Heinz Field games. Washington laughed it off as just a game, but he’s glad the Steelers were scouting him those days. “Hopefully that opened their eyes,” Washington said.

My take: The Steelers look deep into the future and take a third-round chance on an eventual Ben Roethlisberger replacement. By trading up for Oklahoma State quarterback Mason Rudolph at No. 76 overall, Pittsburgh is actively protecting itself whenever Roethlisberger, 36, decides to retire. Pittsburgh targeted Rudolph early in the draft process and spent a lot of time with him at his pro day. His drop to the early third round made this a more palatable move for a team that could have Roethlisberger for at least another three years. But what do you do with Rudolph during that time? Stash and wait? Either way, the inside linebacker crop was thinning out, so the Steelers ditched need and went for value here.

Hoping for the call: Rudolph wanted to be a Steeler because he felt he developed a connection with the coaches. He texted offensive coordinator Randy Fichtner earlier this week to let him know that. He has long admired Roethlisberger and looks forward to jumping into the playbook. “You’re sitting behind an unbelievable player and a good dude,” Rudolph said. “I’m a competitor to the bone. I’ll come in and work my butt off to learn the system.”

The long game: The Steelers throw the deep ball more than most NFL teams, and Rudolph’s specialty is going vertical. He produced a gaudy 13,618 passing yards in three-plus years as a starter, good enough for 9.41 yards per passing attempt. Fichtner believes Rudolph’s anticipation and touch from the pocket will help him in his transition to the pro game. “There’s a lot to love about him,” Fichtner said.

Round 3, No. 92 overall: Chukwuma Okorafor, OT, Western Michigan
My take: The Steelers' selection of project offensive tackle Chukwuma "Chukes" Okorafor doesn't fill a major need but bolsters a position of strength with a 6-foot-6, 320-pound behemoth with natural talent. Pittsburgh will bet on offensive line coach Mike Munchak to turn him into an eventual factor after the departure of Chris Hubbard in free agency. A weak inside linebacker class forced the Steelers to get creative in the third round with Okorafor out of Western Michigan and Oklahoma State quarterback Mason Rudolph. But for a team that's navigating a finite championship window, these moves don't scream "all in."

Unfinished product: Munchak said Okorafor has rawness but has improved each year and has "great strength." Okorafor started 39 games over three years at Western Michigan, and the Steelers are excited about the upside for a player who can man both tackle spots.

"For a big man like him, it's hard to get around him," Munchak said. "He's capable of doing everything we want him to do."

Well-traveled tackle: Okorafor was born in Nigeria, and in 2010 his family emigrated from Botswana to the U.S. He got a late start on football as a result, but Munchak said that's not necessarily a bad thing -- which means he hasn't developed too many bad habits. Okorafor became the 11th-best recruit in Michigan out of Southfield High School. He prefers to go by the name "Chukes."

My take: The Steelers are clearly going for value over need. They've selected two safeties in their first five picks while the hole at starting inside linebacker remains. But Pittsburgh loves the physicality of Allen, who's got ideal size at 6-foot-2, 215 pounds. "He will strike you," defensive backs coach Tom Bradley said. And Allen wanted to end up in Pittsburgh, where he spent summers as a youth. "It's all tears of joy right now," Allen said.

How he fits: The Steelers have eight safeties on the current roster, so seeing the field beyond special teams will take serious effort. But the team stresses the importance of subpackage football, so perhaps Allen can find a home as a hybrid dime linebacker and run supporter. "[Being] around the ball is what he does best," Bradley said. Burnett and Davis could have the inside track on the starting safety job while Edmunds develops.

Round 5, No. 165 overall: Jaylen Samuels, RB, NC State
My take: The Steelers planned to get running back help at some point in the draft and went with a hybrid option in Samuels, who has experience as an H-back or even a tight end. The Steelers are looking for matchup help on third down and feel Samuels, at 225 pounds with a 4.54 40 time, can help in the open field against dime defenses. He’ll start in the running back room. Samuels says he has a “knack for the end zone,” and the numbers back that up. He scored 11 touchdowns on 71 rushing attempts and four scores on 69 catches in 2017, good for a touchdown every 9.3 touches.

How he fits: Le'Veon Bell and James Conner will remain one and two on the depth chart, leaving Samuels to compete with Fitz Toussaint and Stevan Ridley for the third tailback spot. The Steelers have roster spots open at several offensive spots, which bodes well for Samuels’ versatility, assuming he can stick on special teams.

Round 7, No. 246 overall: Joshua Frazier, DT, Alabama
My take: This pick is intriguing because of Frazier’s upside and his connection to Steelers defensive line coach Karl Dunbar, who coached Frazier for two years at Alabama. The 6-foot-2, 321-pound Frazier was a touted prep recruit who lost his job to first-round pick Da'Ron Payne due to injury. Frazier still played in a rotation, and Dunbar liked what he saw from the player. "He can command two blockers," Dunbar said. This pick aligns with a Steelers draft that prioritized versatility and value over need.

How he fits: The Steelers have quality depth on the defensive line but are strongest at the end spot. At tackle, there should be a back-end roster spot available for Frazier or veteran Daniel McCullers. Javon Hargrave is entrenched as the starter but hasn't dominated in that spot. The Steelers like to use a healthy line rotation to keep players fresh, similar to what Frazier saw at Alabama. If he can show a penchant for run-stopping, he'll have a chance. http://www.espn.com/blog/afcnorth/post/ ... -selection

_________________
Tomlin wrote:
You Know; Really Not A Lot To Say. I Really Don't Plan A Lot For These Moments http://www.steelers.com/videos/videos/T ... b99b3e2551


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: The Grades are already coming out...
PostPosted: Sun Apr 29, 2018 6:30 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Wed Jul 09, 2014 7:14 pm
Posts: 1611
Anybody remember the Cardinals fullback Larry Centers?

He was 6'0" 225 pounds and was a 5th round pick.

Centers was a 3 time Pro Bowl Fullback and had 827 receptions for his career with a couple season where he had 101 catches, 99 catches.

That is the comparison I make to Samuels, although maybe Samuels has more potential as a pure runner.

_________________
We have got to come up with a better name for 'sub package defense'!! Any ideas?


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: The Grades are already coming out...
PostPosted: Sun Apr 29, 2018 6:53 pm 
Offline

Joined: Wed Jul 09, 2014 3:40 pm
Posts: 3055
Steelafan77 wrote:
Here is one scribed report card....

Quote:
Day 3 of the 2018 NFL Draft is in the books, and the Pittsburgh Steelers were able to bring in a whopping three more picks during the late rounds. Similar to their top pick of Terrell Edmunds, many experts were wondering just what was going on when the team made some of their picks.

Needless to say, there were some good expert grades, and some not-so-good. Take a look at just some of the NFL experts who weighed-in on the Steelers’ Day 3 haul throughout the draft process.

SB Nation
Pittsburgh Steelers

For six years in a row, the first pick for the Steelers came on the defensive side of the ball. It was a shock to see Terrell Edmunds get taken in the first round by Pittsburgh. Know one saw that coming, but Edmunds can come down hill and can cover. Still, the value is questionable.

Wide receiver James Washington, taken at No. 60 overall, is a good vertical threat who will help the Steelers replace Martavis Bryant, who was traded to Oakland. Mason Rudolph at No. 76 is a pick that got a lot of attention. Can he be the successor to Ben Roethlisberger or is he just another Landry Jones? At the least, it was a good value choice. Western Michigan left tackle Chukwuma Okorafor could move to the right in the NFL, but he’s a solid player and a replacement for Chris Hubbard. Taken in the fifth round, safety Marcus Allen graded out higher than Edmunds for some.

From a value standpoint, arguably Pittsburgh’s best choice was Jaylen Samuels of North Carolina State. He’s a combo tight end, fullback and running back. If there’s a team that can figure out how to use him, it’s the Steelers.

Grade: C-

NFL.com
Pittsburgh Steelers Draft picks: Virginia Tech S Terrell Edmunds (No. 28 overall), Oklahoma State WR James Washington (No. 60 overall), Oklahoma State QB Mason Rudolph (No. 76 overall), Western Michigan OT Chukwuma Okorafor (No. 92 overall), Penn State S Marcus Allen (No. 148 overall), N.C. State RB Jaylen Samuels (No. 165 overall), Alabama DT Joshua Frazier (No. 246 overall).

Day 1 grade: B+
Day 2 grade: B+
Day 3 grade: A
Overall grade: B+

The skinny: The Steelers went safety, as expected, but picked Edmunds, the brother of fellow first-round pick Tremaine, instead of Stanford’s Justin Reid and others. This was a surprise pick to most, and probably a round early -- but given his strength and NFL bloodlines (father, Ferrell, played tight end in the league), but maybe it shouldn’t have been. He’ll be a welcomed addition to the team, either way. Trading Martavis Bryant to Oakland for a third-round pick meant they needed to find another big-play receiver. Washington isn’t tall or an elite speedster, but his super-long arms and ability to win the jump ball make him a solid find late in the second round. He was paired with his former teammate, Rudolph, in the third round. They could make for an interesting duo in a couple of years. Rudolph was a good third-round value. Okorafor could become a starter, but needs to work harder and faster on the field or he’ll be out of the league fast. Allen adds another tough-minded safety to the Steelers’ defensive back trove, though I believe he could be used in a linebacker-type role to take advantage of his toughness and agility. Samuels fits the Steelers’ usage of fullback/H-backs quite well, and will add another wrinkle to their offense. Frazier is a perfect fit for a team in need of a hardworking nose tackle.

CBS Sports
Round 5: Marcus Allen, FS, Penn State

Grade: C+

Another box safety for Pittsburgh. Decent athlete. Slow play-recognition skills, which hurts him in coverage.

Round 5: Jaylen Samuels, TE, NC State

Grade: A-

Ideal player as NFL shifts toward a “positionless” game. Delanie Walker-like. Good, not great in any area. Shifty.

Round 7: Joshua Frazier, DT, Alabama

Grade: C+

Classic, block-eating Alabama nose tackle. Slow feet. Uses his heavy hands well but doesn’t have pass-rush ability. His height hurts him against low-center-of-gravity interior linemen.

Bleacher Report
Round 5: Pittsburgh Steelers: Marcus Allen, Safety, Penn State
Strengths: Character, run support, fundamentals.
Weaknesses: Limited upside.

Marcus Allen is not related to Raiders legend Marcus Allen, though Curtis Martin is his godfather, which has to count for something. (Narrator: It does not count for anything.) Allen is a fundamentally sound, high-effort Cover 2 safety who projects as a capable NFL starter. He’s also a three-year team captain who keeps plays in front of him and will step up in run support. So he’s good. Just don’t hear the name and let your mind trick you into thinking he’s a future Hall of Famer. This should be a popular pick among Steelers fans.

Grade: B-plus

Round 5: Pittsburgh Steelers: Jaylen Samuels, Running Back, North Carolina State
This is the best running back class in years! To help keep things straight and minimize the jargon, Bleacher Report proudly presents another installment of our Field Guide to the 2018 Running Backs!

Athleticism: Very good. Jaylen Samuels tested well as a running back at the combine, even though he tested with the tight ends.

Every-down rushing: Fair to good. Samuels didn’t run between the tackles much for the Wolfpack, but he looked like a quick, decisive downhill runner with power at the Senior Bowl.

Open-field rushing: Fair. Samuels is not that elusive but can accelerate into fourth gear.

Receiving value: Very good to excellent. Samuels is kinda-sorta a slot receiver.

Pass protection: Very good to excellent. Samuels is kinda-sorta also an H-back or tight end. It’s complicated.

Contrary opinion from a “source” having an anxiety attack: Versatility? Who needs versatility? My scouting handbook says to look for prototype runners like Franco Harris and Archie Griffin! Come to think of it, this thing hasn’t been updated in quite some time...

Bottom Line: Samuels is unique. The best comp for him may be Keith Byars, the 1980s Ohio State standout who was miscast as a workhorse back for the Eagles but became a 60-80-catch weapon as a fullback/H-back/sometime rusher. He’s less a potential replacement for Le’Veon Bell than a complement to Bell. The Steelers just acquired one more potential matchup headache. The rest of the AFC should be worried. Especially the Patriots.

Grade: A

Round 7: Pittsburgh Steelers: Joshua Frazier, Defensive Tackle, Alabama
Strengths: Space eating.
Weaknesses: Run defender only.

That’s right; even Alabama’s situational run-pluggers get drafted. Frazier is a Damion Square-type. The Steelers have more use for pure nose tackles than most teams.

Grade: Fair


What say Fury Members....


Go look at the grades handed out the last draft around this time. See how many had Saints rated an A+++ because after one year that is what it looks like. Draft grades would only have merit if the fuckers that put them out got held accountable for them down the road thus had a track record where we could "grade" their grading.


Last edited by steelclan on Sun Apr 29, 2018 6:55 pm, edited 1 time in total.

Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: The Grades are already coming out...
PostPosted: Sun Apr 29, 2018 6:54 pm 
Offline

Joined: Wed Jul 09, 2014 3:40 pm
Posts: 3055
Scunge wrote:
Anybody remember the Cardinals fullback Larry Centers?

He was 6'0" 225 pounds and was a 5th round pick.

Centers was a 3 time Pro Bowl Fullback and had 827 receptions for his career with a couple season where he had 101 catches, 99 catches.

That is the comparison I make to Samuels, although maybe Samuels has more potential as a pure runner.


Nice call. If he turns into that man that would be superb.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: The Grades are already coming out...
PostPosted: Sun Apr 29, 2018 6:57 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Tue Jul 08, 2014 9:45 pm
Posts: 12621
Quote:
Any NFL executive — even those who believe they called all the right shots — will tell you grading a draft before training camp is a fool's task.

That hasn't stopped several national experts from offering their opinions of the Steelers' seven-player haul in the 2018 draft.

Here are some of them:

Sporting News: A-

Steelers general manager Kevin Colbert started with a reach for Virginia Tech safety Terrell Edmunds, but he and Penn State safety Marcus Allen did line up with a bit of a need.

Oklahoma State wide receiver James Washington was a good get for now, while quarterback Mason Rudolph, out of the same program, will help the Steelers soon.

Chukwuma Okafor and Jaylen Samuels have good upside and are ideal for their scheme. The knock comes in the lack of an inside linebacker to replace Ryan Shazier, but the values didn't align there.

Chad Reuter, NFL.com

Day 1 grade: B+

Day 2 grade: B+

Day 3 grade: A

Overall grade: B+

The skinny: The Steelers went safety, as expected, but picked Edmunds, the brother of fellow first-round pick Tremaine, instead of Stanford's Justin Reid and others.

This was a surprise pick to most and probably a round early. But given his strength and NFL bloodlines (father, Ferrell, played tight end in the league), maybe it shouldn't have been.

He will be a welcomed addition to the team, either way.

Trading Martavis Bryant to Oakland for a third-round pick meant they needed to find another big-play receiver.

Washington isn't tall or an elite speedster, but his super-long arms and ability to win the jump ball make him a solid find late in the second round.

He was paired with his former teammate, Rudolph, in the third round. They could make for an interesting duo in a couple of years. Rudolph was a good third-round value.

Okorafor could become a starter but needs to work harder and faster on the field or he'll be out of the league fast.

Allen adds another tough-minded safety to the Steelers' defensive back trove, though I believe he could be used in a linebacker-type role to take advantage of his toughness and agility.

Samuels fits the Steelers' usage of fullback/H-backs quite well and will add another wrinkle to their offense.

Frazier is a perfect fit for a team in need of a hardworking nose tackle.

Jeremy Fowler, ESPN.com

What will the Steelers do now at linebacker?

A massive hole remains in the spot Ryan Shazier deftly commanded for four years. But the Steelers ignored the position in favor of two safeties in the first five rounds. They signed Jon Bostic, but he's more of a stopgap.

Here's where it gets interesting, though: The Steelers navigated a weak linebacker class by getting versatile players who might be able to handle linebacker duties in third-down subpackages.

“Those lines bleed together” in today's hybrid NFL, coach Mike Tomlin said.

So perhaps first-round pick Terrell Edmunds will end up replacing Shazier, he just doesn't know it yet.

Sam Monson and Steve Palazzolo, Pro Football Focus

Day 1: In one of the bigger surprises of Round 1, the Steelers add Terrell Edmunds, who brings an exceptional athletic profile but an inconsistent on-field performance.

His best overall grade of 76.8 came in 2016, and given his athleticism, his best path to success is as a versatile coverage player.

His movement skills show up on film, and he has plenty of highlight-reel plays, including six interceptions and 10 pass breakups on 104 career targets. But there are also far too many plays where he is simply a step out of position at the catch point.

Day 2: The Steelers snagged one of the nation's most prolific duos in Oklahoma State's James Washington and Mason Rudolph. Washington led the country with 815 yards on deep passes last season, and he has downfield body control to continue that production at the next level.

Rudolph is a fine developmental option behind Ben Roethlisberger as he was in the first-round discussion throughout the draft process. Rudolph posted the top grade in the draft class on third downs, though his short-area ball location and red zone work must improve.

Chukwuma Okorafor has a classic offensive tackle frame, but he's a developmental player at this stage after topping out with a 78.6 overall grade in 2016.

Day 3: Marcus Allen is a classic box-safety who is strong against the run, but he might be limited as a coverage player. His run-stop percentage of 8.3 when lined up in the box ranked fifth in the nation in 2016, and he's posted grades of 88.0 and 83.4 against the run the past two years.

Jaylen Samuels is an offensive mismatch weapon as he played running back, tight end, fullback and slot receiver at N.C. State. He rushed for 1,095 yards and picked up 1,865 as a receiver in college while ranking 16th among draft-class tight ends with 1.43 yards per route run last season.

Overall grade: Average

Mel Kiper, ESPN, C+

This is the rare class in which I liked every pick except the first one.

Safety Terrell Edmunds was way down my board, and he's a risk at No. 28 overall. There were a lot of good safeties on the board. Justin Reid? Jessie Bates III?

I can see why the Steelers like Edmunds' traits, but his tape didn't match his athleticism.

After that pick, my only question for the Steelers is: Where's the linebacker? They didn't find a replacement for Ryan Shazier inside, and they didn't even take a flier on an edge player on Day 3.

Oklahoma State tandem Mason Rudolph (pick 76) and James Washington (60) were so good together that Pittsburgh decided to bring them both along. And if the Steelers found the eventual replacements for Ben Roethlisberger and Martavis Bryant, this draft will be viewed much differently. But Rudolph isn't without risk. He's a little stiff, but he throws a beautiful deep ball.

Offensive tackle Chukwuma Okorafor (92) started 39 games at both tackle spots for Western Michigan. H-back Jaylen Samuels (165) is one of the most versatile offensive players in the entire class. He's only 5-11, but he had 201 catches in his career.

So, again, the first-round risk was too high for me, and the absence of a linebacker means I have to downgrade this class.

Mike Mayock, NFL Network

No. 28. Terrell Edmunds, S

He's a very physical football player. Played him a lot in the box, almost played dime linebacker. Explosive athlete. I think the key here is he can match tight ends.

60. James Washington, WR

What this young man is is a vertical finisher. He gets on top, stacks you and he's got as good ball skills on the deep ball as any player I've seen in college football recently. He's got the arm length of a 6-foot-6 guy. I think he's got a little bit of tightness in intermediate routes.

76. Mason Rudolph, QB

I think he's the best deep-ball thrower in this draft. Minimal escapability.

92. Chukwuma Okorafor, T

Looks the part. Massive frame, long arms. His tape is underwhelming. He could be a Donovan Smith. He is a big, square, naturally powerful dude, and you want so much more. The tape is at best average. The question is, can you light a fire under him? http://triblive.com/sports/steelers/135 ... lers-draft


I agree clan. I'm not a fan of the 'day after' grades when the athlete hasn't even sniffed the field in the NFL yet. Laughable is an understatement. For me it's interesting to see what they say and then return to their 'expert' opinion later down the road to gauge how 'expert' they really are.

_________________
Tomlin wrote:
You Know; Really Not A Lot To Say. I Really Don't Plan A Lot For These Moments http://www.steelers.com/videos/videos/T ... b99b3e2551


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: The Grades are already coming out...
PostPosted: Sun Apr 29, 2018 7:50 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Tue Jul 08, 2014 9:16 pm
Posts: 6424
Steelafan77 wrote:
Quote:
Any NFL executive — even those who believe they called all the right shots — will tell you grading a draft before training camp is a fool's task.

That hasn't stopped several national experts from offering their opinions of the Steelers' seven-player haul in the 2018 draft.

Here are some of them:

Sporting News: A-

Steelers general manager Kevin Colbert started with a reach for Virginia Tech safety Terrell Edmunds, but he and Penn State safety Marcus Allen did line up with a bit of a need.

Oklahoma State wide receiver James Washington was a good get for now, while quarterback Mason Rudolph, out of the same program, will help the Steelers soon.

Chukwuma Okafor and Jaylen Samuels have good upside and are ideal for their scheme. The knock comes in the lack of an inside linebacker to replace Ryan Shazier, but the values didn't align there.

Chad Reuter, NFL.com

Day 1 grade: B+

Day 2 grade: B+

Day 3 grade: A

Overall grade: B+

The skinny: The Steelers went safety, as expected, but picked Edmunds, the brother of fellow first-round pick Tremaine, instead of Stanford's Justin Reid and others.

This was a surprise pick to most and probably a round early. But given his strength and NFL bloodlines (father, Ferrell, played tight end in the league), maybe it shouldn't have been.

He will be a welcomed addition to the team, either way.

Trading Martavis Bryant to Oakland for a third-round pick meant they needed to find another big-play receiver.

Washington isn't tall or an elite speedster, but his super-long arms and ability to win the jump ball make him a solid find late in the second round.

He was paired with his former teammate, Rudolph, in the third round. They could make for an interesting duo in a couple of years. Rudolph was a good third-round value.

Okorafor could become a starter but needs to work harder and faster on the field or he'll be out of the league fast.

Allen adds another tough-minded safety to the Steelers' defensive back trove, though I believe he could be used in a linebacker-type role to take advantage of his toughness and agility.

Samuels fits the Steelers' usage of fullback/H-backs quite well and will add another wrinkle to their offense.

Frazier is a perfect fit for a team in need of a hardworking nose tackle.

Jeremy Fowler, ESPN.com

What will the Steelers do now at linebacker?

A massive hole remains in the spot Ryan Shazier deftly commanded for four years. But the Steelers ignored the position in favor of two safeties in the first five rounds. They signed Jon Bostic, but he's more of a stopgap.

Here's where it gets interesting, though: The Steelers navigated a weak linebacker class by getting versatile players who might be able to handle linebacker duties in third-down subpackages.

“Those lines bleed together” in today's hybrid NFL, coach Mike Tomlin said.

So perhaps first-round pick Terrell Edmunds will end up replacing Shazier, he just doesn't know it yet.

Sam Monson and Steve Palazzolo, Pro Football Focus

Day 1: In one of the bigger surprises of Round 1, the Steelers add Terrell Edmunds, who brings an exceptional athletic profile but an inconsistent on-field performance.

His best overall grade of 76.8 came in 2016, and given his athleticism, his best path to success is as a versatile coverage player.

His movement skills show up on film, and he has plenty of highlight-reel plays, including six interceptions and 10 pass breakups on 104 career targets. But there are also far too many plays where he is simply a step out of position at the catch point.

Day 2: The Steelers snagged one of the nation's most prolific duos in Oklahoma State's James Washington and Mason Rudolph. Washington led the country with 815 yards on deep passes last season, and he has downfield body control to continue that production at the next level.

Rudolph is a fine developmental option behind Ben Roethlisberger as he was in the first-round discussion throughout the draft process. Rudolph posted the top grade in the draft class on third downs, though his short-area ball location and red zone work must improve.

Chukwuma Okorafor has a classic offensive tackle frame, but he's a developmental player at this stage after topping out with a 78.6 overall grade in 2016.

Day 3: Marcus Allen is a classic box-safety who is strong against the run, but he might be limited as a coverage player. His run-stop percentage of 8.3 when lined up in the box ranked fifth in the nation in 2016, and he's posted grades of 88.0 and 83.4 against the run the past two years.

Jaylen Samuels is an offensive mismatch weapon as he played running back, tight end, fullback and slot receiver at N.C. State. He rushed for 1,095 yards and picked up 1,865 as a receiver in college while ranking 16th among draft-class tight ends with 1.43 yards per route run last season.

Overall grade: Average

Mel Kiper, ESPN, C+

This is the rare class in which I liked every pick except the first one.

Safety Terrell Edmunds was way down my board, and he's a risk at No. 28 overall. There were a lot of good safeties on the board. Justin Reid? Jessie Bates III?

I can see why the Steelers like Edmunds' traits, but his tape didn't match his athleticism.

After that pick, my only question for the Steelers is: Where's the linebacker? They didn't find a replacement for Ryan Shazier inside, and they didn't even take a flier on an edge player on Day 3.

Oklahoma State tandem Mason Rudolph (pick 76) and James Washington (60) were so good together that Pittsburgh decided to bring them both along. And if the Steelers found the eventual replacements for Ben Roethlisberger and Martavis Bryant, this draft will be viewed much differently. But Rudolph isn't without risk. He's a little stiff, but he throws a beautiful deep ball.

Offensive tackle Chukwuma Okorafor (92) started 39 games at both tackle spots for Western Michigan. H-back Jaylen Samuels (165) is one of the most versatile offensive players in the entire class. He's only 5-11, but he had 201 catches in his career.

So, again, the first-round risk was too high for me, and the absence of a linebacker means I have to downgrade this class.

Mike Mayock, NFL Network

No. 28. Terrell Edmunds, S

He's a very physical football player. Played him a lot in the box, almost played dime linebacker. Explosive athlete. I think the key here is he can match tight ends.

60. James Washington, WR

What this young man is is a vertical finisher. He gets on top, stacks you and he's got as good ball skills on the deep ball as any player I've seen in college football recently. He's got the arm length of a 6-foot-6 guy. I think he's got a little bit of tightness in intermediate routes.

76. Mason Rudolph, QB

I think he's the best deep-ball thrower in this draft. Minimal escapability.

92. Chukwuma Okorafor, T

Looks the part. Massive frame, long arms. His tape is underwhelming. He could be a Donovan Smith. He is a big, square, naturally powerful dude, and you want so much more. The tape is at best average. The question is, can you light a fire under him? http://triblive.com/sports/steelers/135 ... lers-draft


I agree clan. I'm not a fan of the 'day after' grades when the athlete hasn't even sniffed the field in the NFL yet. Laughable is an understatement. For me it's interesting to see what they say and then return to their 'expert' opinion later down the road to gauge how 'expert' they really are.


This place included....

_________________
https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=GflYTviOIag


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: The Grades are already coming out...
PostPosted: Sun Apr 29, 2018 7:50 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Tue Jul 08, 2014 9:22 pm
Posts: 2281
Way too early, reactionary grade is D- from me. I hated it. But I'm happy to be wrong.

_________________
Image


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: The Grades are already coming out...
PostPosted: Sun Apr 29, 2018 7:56 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Thu Jul 10, 2014 2:46 pm
Posts: 1311
I like how both samuels and Washington are guys tagged with getting into the EZ. There’s plenty to be said about strategy and matchups but sometimes it’s about making a guy miss making a cut and driving for the pylon.

Steelers can always use young guys that bring that.


Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 52 posts ]  Go to page 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6  Next

All times are UTC - 5 hours [ DST ]


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: Google [Bot] and 9 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum

Search for:
cron
FORUM RULES --- PRIVACY POLICY




Powered by phpBB © 2000, 2002, 2005, 2007 phpBB Group